Do We Have To Be Offended By Everything

9 Jan

You are a smart person and you pride yourself on your critical thinking abilities and general good taste.

You read or hear or watch something and find yourself smiling, nodding in agreement, maybe even laughing out loud. This, whatever this happens to be, is genius. Whoever created it somehow articulated exactly what you’ve been thinking but have never been able to put into words. Nothing has ever been more perfect.

You share what you’ve just read, heard or watched with your friends, expecting that they’ll be just as blown away by the insight and hilarity as you were. And some people do get it, so you high five to celebrate your mutual intelligence and awesomeness. But then a few of your friends start to voice misgivings, and then someone comes right out and says it:

This isn’t cool.

Here’s the thing – you’re not a bad person. In fact, you would typically describe yourself as kind-hearted, open-minded and even downright liberal.  You support marriage equality, you think that the patriarchy is a Real Thing, you’re against oppression and intolerance of any kind, and you use terms like social justicewhite privilege and problematic. You are a good person. So if you think that what you shared was cool, and so many other people that you like and respect thought it was cool, then it stands to reason that it must be cool. And rather than second-guessing yourself or taking a fresh look at the video or blog post or whatever it was you shared, you let your knee-jerk self-righteousness and fear take over. Because, let’s be honest – as much as you believe that you’re in the right right, you are also afraid. Afraid that you are what you purport to hate, or at the very least unconsciously participating in a system that you hate.

And so you begin to loudly dismiss and belittle the other person’s concerns.

“Calm down, it’s just a joke.”

“You’re taking this too seriously.”

“You’re reading something into this that just isn’t there.”

“Honestly, do we have to be offended by everything now?”

“You are way too sensitive.”

“I have a black/gay/trans*/female friend, and they don’t think this is racist/homophobic/transphobic/sexist.”

You might even throw in a word or two about censorship, if you’re in the right mood.

Because of course you must be in the right. If there was any problem with the content in question, you would have been the first to see it. If the joke was offensive, you wouldn’t have laughed. If this was something likely to hurt another person, you wouldn’t have shared it.

You are a good person.

So if someone is offended, that’s their problem, not yours. Maybe they’re too sensitive, or else maybe they’re just trying to show off somehow or cause a ruckus when there doesn’t need to be one. Chances are that they don’t even really feel hurt or upset; they have some other ulterior motive for their reaction. Or maybe they just don’t get it. Maybe they don’t understand satire, or maybe the joke went right over their head.

Whatever the case is, there is no possible chance that you could be wrong.

And yet.

What if you are wrong?

And what if your defensiveness has effectively shut down an opportunity to learn something?

And what if you genuinely did hurt someone?

Because the thing is, typically if someone is telling you that something isn’t cool, they’re not doing it out of a spirit of malice or a desire to police the things that you enjoy. They’re not trying to ruin all your fun. They’re telling you that this, whatever this is, could at best hurt someone’s feelings and at worst promote a dangerous and potentially violent world view.

Our experiences obviously vary a great deal from person to person, and the lens through which we view things can very much depend on factors like race, gender, sexuality and class. So something that might strike one person as harmless has the potential to affect someone else in a very different way. And I get that it’s hard to get outside of our own heads sometimes, and it’s hard to admit that we might be wrong, and it’s especially fucking hard to examine our own privilege and the way that privilege colours our perception, but seriously – how else do you expect to learn and grow as a person?

Take a moment right now to ask yourself what you are truly saying when you tell someone that they are too easily offended. That you value your ability to post rape jokes on Facebook more than you do their friendship? That the right to free speech is a one way street, open only to you and those agree with you? That you don’t care about something so long as it doesn’t directly affect you?

So I guess it all boils down to what kind of person you want to be – do you want to be someone who is caring and compassionate, someone who takes others’ feelings into consideration? Or do you want to be someone who is always right? Because there’s no way that you can be both.

Life is an ongoing exercise in empathy. As a human being, your job should be constantly learning how to make your own way in this world while causing as little harm as possible.  Which is why I’m ultimately baffled when people wonder aloud if they’re supposed to look at everything critically and worry about its potential to harm others. Because yes. Yes, that is exactly what you are supposed to do.

And while you may laugh at the ridiculousness of what some people find offensive, the fact is that one day you are going to stumble across something and it’s going to hurt you. When that day comes, you are going to want someone to listen to you and try to understand where you’re coming from. So you know what? You be that person. You be that person right now, and you listen to others, and you exercise empathy. Because one day you’re going to be on the other side of the calm-down-it’s-just-a-joke argument, and when that time comes you are going to bitterly regret every single instance in which you downplayed or ignored what someone else was trying to tell you.

Empathy 2

68 Responses to “Do We Have To Be Offended By Everything”

  1. DCFem January 16, 2014 at 9:08 pm #

    This is GREAT!

    But please delete the extra “someone” in the last line so that I can spread this far and wide. I have a lot of copy editor friends who will miss the forest for that one little tree. Thank you.

  2. Rick January 18, 2014 at 3:39 am #

    “the fact is that one day you are going to stumble across something and it’s going to hurt you.” Yeah, when that day comes, I’m going to shrug my shoulders, say “that person is an asshole,” and go on with my life the way I always have.

    After all, even assholes have free speech in this country. And if you let an asshole ruin your day, that my friend is ON YOU.

  3. savannahinwonderland January 19, 2014 at 1:23 am #

    Thank you for this post! So many people need just this kind of reminder of their own privilege and the validity of others’ feelings.

  4. savannahinwonderland January 19, 2014 at 1:23 am #

    Reblogged this on savannahinwonderland and commented:
    So eloquently put. Good read!

  5. MichaelTSebren February 16, 2014 at 4:36 am #

    Reblogged this on My Michael.

  6. StepsInShadows March 15, 2014 at 10:38 am #

    Reblogged this on Swift, like Shadows.

  7. Paranoid April 10, 2014 at 10:47 pm #

    I learned that the hard way. But now I’ve gone the opposite direction and I’m so afraid of offending people that I just say nothing at all to certain people.
    Like one time I was at Hale and Hearty Soup, and I chose to order soup I didn’t like because I was afraid of offending the server, a woman of African ancestry (wrote that because I’m afraid of offending someone by using the term black or African American) by ordering the Senegalese Chicken Peanut Soup.
    I would’ve gotten something from the Halal cart, but I was afraid of offending the Muslim vendor by being a white person eating this food.
    I even considered moving out of my predominantly Dominican neighborhood even though everyone there has been really friendly and welcoming when they learned I recently moved there.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. 7 @ 9: We know the game and we’re gonna play it - January 16, 2014

    […] 7. The Belle Jar: “Do We Have to Be Offended by Everything?” […]

  2. Suggestion Saturday: January 25, 2014 | On The Other Hand - January 25, 2014

    […] From Do We Have to be Offended by Everything: […]

  3. Trigger Warnings: It’s About Empathy and Choice | Make Me a Sammich - March 5, 2014

    […] I’ll close with a quote from the always-amazing Anne Theriault of The Belle Jar: […]

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